Women + Wikipedia

One of the reasons I'm so passionate about helping women tell their stories is that our stories have been omitted from so much of the world's official history.

 Women at a Wikipedia edit-a-thon, making sure women's stories are reflected (photo by Francesca Lissoni)

Women at a Wikipedia edit-a-thon, making sure women's stories are reflected (photo by Francesca Lissoni)

The more we document our stories today, the better chance we have to become part of the official record for tomorrow. But that's not enough. We also need women (and feminist men) editing historical texts — the ones bound up in official-looking volumes, and the ones that dominate our Google searches.

That's right: I'm talking about Wikipedia.

Which is where Wikipedia edit-a-thons, brought to us by a group called Art+Feminism, come in:

In 2011, it was reported that less than 10% of people editing the entries we read every day about celebrities, scientists, writers, and teachers were women. What happens when the people editing our history don’t look like us? Don’t sound like us? Don’t know our lived experiences? Don’t see the value in our history?
— Art+Feminism website

Find an edit-a-thon near you

If you're feeling like, "But I don't know how to edit a Wikipedia article," fear not! They've got you covered with this Learn to Edit toolkit. 

Let's do this.